Science > Treatments
Treatments
Rider after rider reports that the Game Ready® Equine System has helped keep their horse performing at his peak or accelerated their horse’s recovery from injury or surgery. Always consult with your veterinarian before using Game Ready Equine, as the care of each horse is specific and needs may vary. Your veterinarian can determine whether or not the system is appropriate for your horse, and can provide advice on how to best use the system for your needs.


Definitions, Protocols, and Case Studies:

Veterinarians have reported success with the following treatment protocols. This does not constitute medical advice. Click each link below to read definitions, treatment protocols, and case studies where available.


Abrasion
Big Knees / Epiphysitis
Bowed Tendon
Bucked Shins
Capped Hock
Cellulitis
Check Ligament
Cunean Tendon
Deep Flexor Tendon
Desmitis
Hock Injuries
Injury Prevention
Post-Operative Recovery
Superficial Flexor Tendon
Suspensory Ligament / Strains, Sprains



Abrasion


An abrasion is a wound caused by rubbing or friction (rope burns are typical abrasions). Characteristically, only the top layer of skin and hair are rubbed off, but sometimes deeper tissues are involved.

Treatment

Depending on where the abrasion is located, any wrap may be beneficial for this type of wound. The abrasion may be treated once a day for approximately 30 minutes. This will allow the inflammation to decrease around the injury site. The optimal compression setting depends on the abrasion and horse’s tolerance. Once the horse is comfortable with the compression of the wraps, the pressure may be set at the highest level (refer to the User Guide for accompanying pressure recommendations for specific wraps). Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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Big Knees / Epiphysitis


This is an inflammation of the growth plate of the long bones, primarily found in the lower end of the radius above the knee. An enlargement or swelling over the knee that is firm or painful should be checked by a veterinarian.

Treatment

The Full Leg Wrap would be beneficial for this ailment and may be used for treatment once or twice a day for 30 minutes. The optimal compression setting depends on the injury and horse’s tolerance. Once the horse is comfortable with the compression of the wraps, the pressure may be set at the highest level (refer to the User Guide for accompanying pressure recommendations for specific wraps). Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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Bowed Tendon


Any damage to the tendon which causes inflammation may be referred to as a “bow.” The terms tendonitis and tendosynovitis differentiate between an inflammation involving only the tendon and one which involves both the tendon and its sheath. Damage to the tendon may result in a high, middle, or low bow in addition to the “classic” bow, which involves all three categories.

Immediate attention can mean the difference between enabling the horse to return to work and retiring him. If there is any indication that the horse may have a bowed tendon, immediately rest your horse and call a veterinarian.

Treatment

When a bowed tendon has occurred apply Game Ready Equine as quickly as possible. The cold and compression act together to diminish the amount of lymphatic fluid that seeps out of the injured blood vessels. Presence of fluid in the surrounding tissues will form adhesions, which will cause scar tissue in the affected area.

Common treatment on an acute bowed tendon is every 2 hours with a 30 minute treatment using the Utility Wraps for the first 24 hours. Initially the horse may receive cold treatment only — without compression. After the horse has settled, you may adjust the compression to low and maintain that setting until the horse is comfortable again. You will likely want to have the horse on the highest level of recommended compression as quickly as possible but this may take a few hours or a few days. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

Read case study.

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Bucked Shins


Bucked shins are a periostitis (inflammation of the bone covering) affecting the front side of the cannon bone. They are common in the front limbs, but not in the hind legs.

In mild cases, bucked shins are caused by the stretching or tearing of the periosteum adjacent to the extensor tendons, although trauma of the periosteum for other causes may be involved (generally caused by concussion in immature horses). They rarely occur in horses over three years old. The condition is diagnosed when a painful swelling appears on the front of the cannon bone, which is warm to the touch. Lameness will increase with exercise and the gait will be choppy.

Treatment

Game Ready Equine’s Utility Wraps would be beneficial in this injury and are used for treatment twice a day for 30 minutes for the first week. The optimal compression setting depends on the injury and the horse’s tolerance. Once the horse is comfortable with the compression of the wraps, the pressure may be set at the highest level (refer to User Guide for accompanying pressure recommendations for specific wraps). After the first week, the treatments may be reduced to once a day for 30 minutes, and continue for a two to three week period or more. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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Capped Hock


A capped hock is the inflammation of the bursa over the point of the hock. A cap forms which may be soft, and fluid fills around the area when it’s fresh. Initially the swelling of the bursa will be soft and varied in size, but eventually will harden. Lameness rarely occurs and almost never persists, and if it is present, will be mild.

Treatment

The Hock Wraps would be beneficial in this injury and may be used for treatment twice a day for 45 minutes for the first week. The compression setting may be set to Low. Once the horse is comfortable with the compression in the wraps, the pressure may be set to Medium. After the first week, the treatments may be reduced to once a day for 30 minutes, and continue for a two to three week period. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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Cellulitis


Cellulitis is a serious condition resulting from an infection which has spread from a wound to the surrounding subcutaneous connective tissue and tissue spaces. It is characterized by hot, painful swelling accompanied by fever, depression, and loss of appetite. In addition, the bacteria will produce gas which is trapped under the skin. Cellulitis may develop into toxemia or septicemia. Small, infected puncture wounds are often the source of cellulitis.

Treatment

The recommended treatment for cellulitis is applying Game Ready Equine every 2 to 3 hours with a 45 minute treatment session using the Utility Wraps. Initially the horse may be started using cold without compression. After the horse has settled, you may adjust the compression to Low and maintain that setting until the horse is comfortable again. You may want to have the horse on the highest recommended level of compression as quickly as possible but this might take a few hours or a few days. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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Check Ligament


The check ligament can be strained by a simultaneous dorsal flexion of the fetlock and over flexion of the knee. The result will be an acute or chronic lameness depending on the severity of the tendon tear.

Treatment

The recommended treatment for the check ligament is to apply cold and compression every 2 to 3 hours with a 45 minute treatment session using the Utility Wraps. Initially the horse may be started using cold therapy without compression. After the horse has settled, you may adjust the compression to Low and maintain that setting until the horse is comfortable again. You may want to have the horse on the highest recommended level of compression as quickly as possible but this might take a few hours or a few days. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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Cunean Tendon


Bursitis of the cunean tendon in the hock is thought to be caused by strain. The bursa involved in bursitis of the cunean tendon is between the tendon itself and the ligaments overlaying the tarsal bones.

Treatment

The Hock Wraps would be beneficial in rehabilitating this injury and may be used for treatment twice a day for 45 minutes for the first week. The compression setting may begin on Low. Once the horse is comfortable with the compression, the pressure may be set to Medium. After the first week, the treatments may be reduced to once a day for 30 minutes, and continue for a two to three week period. A re-examination of the injury will likely be prescribed by your veterinarian. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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Deep Flexor Tendon


Please refer to Bowed Tendon section.

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Desmitis


The suspensory ligament can be strained, sprained, or ruptured. A strain is stress on the ligament which results in soreness and inflammation. A sprain also involves stress and inflammation, but goes on to incur actual tearing of some fibers of the ligament. A rupture is a complete tearing of a section of the fibers of the ligament. The involved inflammation of the ligament related to all three types of injuries is called Desmitis.

Treatment

Apply cold and compression every 2 to 3 hours with a 30-45 minute treatment session using the Utility Wraps. Initially the horse may be started with just cold therapy, without compression. After the horse has settled, you may adjust the compression to Low and maintain that setting until the horse is comfortable again. You may want to have the horse on the highest recommended level of compression as quickly as possible but this might take a few hours or a few days. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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Hock Injuries


Achilles Tendon, Plantar Tarsal Ligament, Tarso Metatarsal Ligament, Short Lateral, Long Lateral, Short Medial, and Long Medial are injuries that may be treated with the Game Ready Equine Hock Wraps.

Treatment

The Hock Wraps would be beneficial in this ailment. Hocks may be treated once or twice a day for 30 minutes. The compression setting will depend on the injury and the horse’s tolerance. Medium pressure is the highest recommended setting for the Game Ready Equine Hock Wraps. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

Read case study.

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Injury Prevention


Acute injuries are often the result of long term, cumulative damage resulting from rigorous schooling programs and show schedules. Minimizing the inflammatory reaction and subsequent tissue damage through consistent post-workout management practices can be key to preventing a serious injury.

Treatment

Applying any of the Game Ready Equine Wraps (Utility, Full Leg , Hock) for 30 minutes after each strenuous workout may help keep your horse performing at his peak. The compression setting will depend on the horse’s tolerance. Medium pressure is the highest recommended setting for the Game Ready Equine Hock Wraps. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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Post-Operative Recovery


Use of dry cold and active compression therapy after surgery has been reported to have a role in reducing post-operative pain and swelling as well as overall recovery.

Treatment

Beginning treatments with no pressure, you may apply the appropriate Game Ready Equine Wrap (Utility, Full Leg, Hock) 30 minutes per treatment, for 2-4 weeks after surgery. Consult your veterinarian for a specific protocol based on the needs of your horse.

Read case study.

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Superficial Flexor Tendon


Please refer to the Bowed Tendon section.

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Suspensory Ligament / Strains and Sprains


Strains and sprains of the suspensory ligament can result in acute lameness and swelling in the early stages. In the chronic stage, there is extensive fibrosis (scar tissue) and swelling near or at the attachment to the sesamoid bone. X-Ray and/or Ultrasound by a veterinarian will determine the extent of the damage to the horse.

Treatment

The Utility Wraps would be beneficial in this injury and may be used for treatment once or twice a day for 30 minutes for the first week. The optimal compression setting depends on the injury and the horse’s tolerance. Once the horse is comfortable with the compression of the wraps, the pressure may be set at the highest level possible. After the first week, the treatments may be reduced to once a day for 30 minutes, and continue for a two to three week period. Please consult your veterinarian to determine the best protocol for your horse’s specific needs.

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